29th Sep, 2022 13:00

DAY 1 - TWO-DAY AUCTION - Fine Chinese Art / 中國藝術集珍 / Buddhism & Hinduism

 
Lot 251
 

251

A BLACK SCHIST FIGURE OF GANESHA WITH A SNAKE MANDORLA, PALA PERIOD

Sold for €39,000

including Buyer's Premium


Lot details

Northeastern India, Bihar, 11th century. The six-armed pot-bellied god of auspicious beginnings and granter of fulfillment is shown here in a dancing pose on a double lotus base, flanked by four attendants, holding a battle ax, a bowl of sweets and an arched snake, his head slightly turned in a joyful expression, the base carved with a mouse as his vehicle (vahana). The arched snake also cleverly forms the mandorla which is flanked by two elaborately carved apsaras.

Expert’s note: Ganesha has a mythical connection with snakes, which is only seldomly found in statues with his image. The story begins with Ganesha eating a lot of candies until his belly became very big and hard to move. When he was going home late in the night, Ganesha rode a mouse as his vahana. In the journey, Ganesha was interrupted by a snake that frightened him and so he fell. Ganesha could not stand up again because his belly was too full. This incident was observed by the moon that laughed out loud. Ganesha was offended by that and cursed the moon to disappear. This made the world instantly dark so that there were many requests to Ganesha to cancel the curse, and he was able to change it so that the moon now only disappears once a month. (Dwyer, 2015, page 270)

Provenance: A private collection in Bologna, Italy, c. 1995-1998. Leonardo Vigorelli, Bergamo, acquired from the above. Leonardo Vigorelli is a retired Italian art dealer and noted collector, specializing in African and ancient Hindu-Buddhist art. After studying anthropology and decades of travel as well as extensive field research in India, the Himalayan region, Southeast Asia, and Africa, he founded the Dalton Somaré art gallery in Milan, Italy, which today is being run by his two sons.
Condition: Very good condition, commensurate with age. Extensive wear, signs of weathering and erosion, soil encrustations, some losses, nicks and surface scratches, structural cracks. The present sculpture bears the telltale signs of raised edges rubbed smooth where beholders were gripped with the overt temptation to caress the forehead, trunk and protruding belly.

Dimensions: Height 61.5 cm (excl. base) and 63.7 cm (incl. base)

With a modern metal base.

Literature comparison:
Compare a related six-armed sandstone sculpture of Ganesha, dated to the 11th century, Madhya Pradesh, in the collection of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, accession number M.88.221.

Auction result comparison:
Type: Closely related
Auction: Christie’s New York, 19 September 2002, lot 42
Price: USD 50,190 or approx. EUR 81,000 converted and adjusted for inflation at the time of writing
Description: A Black Stone Stele of Ganesha, Northeastern India, Pala Period, 10th/11th century
Expert remark: Compare the closely related pose, decorations, stone, and size (60.9 cm)

Auction result comparison:
Type: Closely related
Auction: Christie’s New York, 16 September 2008, lot 377
Price: USD 68,500 or approx. EUR 92,500 converted and adjusted for inflation at the time of writing
Description: A Black Stone Stele of Ganesha, Northeastern India, Pala Period, 11th century
Expert remark: Compare the closely related pose, decorations and stone.

 

Northeastern India, Bihar, 11th century. The six-armed pot-bellied god of auspicious beginnings and granter of fulfillment is shown here in a dancing pose on a double lotus base, flanked by four attendants, holding a battle ax, a bowl of sweets and an arched snake, his head slightly turned in a joyful expression, the base carved with a mouse as his vehicle (vahana). The arched snake also cleverly forms the mandorla which is flanked by two elaborately carved apsaras.

Expert’s note: Ganesha has a mythical connection with snakes, which is only seldomly found in statues with his image. The story begins with Ganesha eating a lot of candies until his belly became very big and hard to move. When he was going home late in the night, Ganesha rode a mouse as his vahana. In the journey, Ganesha was interrupted by a snake that frightened him and so he fell. Ganesha could not stand up again because his belly was too full. This incident was observed by the moon that laughed out loud. Ganesha was offended by that and cursed the moon to disappear. This made the world instantly dark so that there were many requests to Ganesha to cancel the curse, and he was able to change it so that the moon now only disappears once a month. (Dwyer, 2015, page 270)

Provenance: A private collection in Bologna, Italy, c. 1995-1998. Leonardo Vigorelli, Bergamo, acquired from the above. Leonardo Vigorelli is a retired Italian art dealer and noted collector, specializing in African and ancient Hindu-Buddhist art. After studying anthropology and decades of travel as well as extensive field research in India, the Himalayan region, Southeast Asia, and Africa, he founded the Dalton Somaré art gallery in Milan, Italy, which today is being run by his two sons.
Condition: Very good condition, commensurate with age. Extensive wear, signs of weathering and erosion, soil encrustations, some losses, nicks and surface scratches, structural cracks. The present sculpture bears the telltale signs of raised edges rubbed smooth where beholders were gripped with the overt temptation to caress the forehead, trunk and protruding belly.

Dimensions: Height 61.5 cm (excl. base) and 63.7 cm (incl. base)

With a modern metal base.

Literature comparison:
Compare a related six-armed sandstone sculpture of Ganesha, dated to the 11th century, Madhya Pradesh, in the collection of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, accession number M.88.221.

Auction result comparison:
Type: Closely related
Auction: Christie’s New York, 19 September 2002, lot 42
Price: USD 50,190 or approx. EUR 81,000 converted and adjusted for inflation at the time of writing
Description: A Black Stone Stele of Ganesha, Northeastern India, Pala Period, 10th/11th century
Expert remark: Compare the closely related pose, decorations, stone, and size (60.9 cm)

Auction result comparison:
Type: Closely related
Auction: Christie’s New York, 16 September 2008, lot 377
Price: USD 68,500 or approx. EUR 92,500 converted and adjusted for inflation at the time of writing
Description: A Black Stone Stele of Ganesha, Northeastern India, Pala Period, 11th century
Expert remark: Compare the closely related pose, decorations and stone.

Zacke Live Online Bidding

Our online bidding platform makes it easier than ever to bid in our auctions! When you bid through our website, you can take advantage of our premium buyer's terms without incurring any additional online bidding surcharges.

To bid live online, you'll need to create an online account. Once your account is created and your identity is verified, you can register to bid in an auction up to 12 hours before the auction begins. 

Create an Account

  

Intended Spend and Bid Limits

When you register to bid in an online auction, you will need to share your intended maximum spending budget for the auction. We will then review your intended spend and set a bid limit for you. Once you have pre-registered for a live online auction, you can see your intended spend and bid limit by going to 'Account Settings' and clicking on 'Live Bidding Registrations'. 

Your bid limit will be the maximum amount you can bid during the auction. Your bid limit is for the hammer price and is not affected by the buyer’s premium and VAT.  For example, if you have a bid limit of €1,000 and place two winning bids for €300 and €200, then you will only be able to bid €500 for the rest of the auction. If you try to place a bid that is higher than €500, you will not be able to do so.

 

Online Absentee and Telephone Bids

You can now leave absentee and telephone bids on our website! 

Absentee Bidding

Once you've created an account and your identity is verified, you can leave your absentee bid directly on the lot page. We will contact you when your bids have been confirmed.

Telephone Bidding

Once you've created an account and your identity is verified, you can leave telephone bids online. We will contact you when your bids have been confirmed.

Telephone Bidding Form

 

Classic Absentee and Telephone Bidding Form

You can still submit absentee and telephone bids by email or fax if you prefer. Simply fill out the Absentee Bidding/Telephone bidding form and return it to us by email at office@zacke.at or by fax at +43 (1) 532 04 52 20.

Fine Japanese Art Bidding Form

Asian Art Holiday Sale Bidding Form

 

How-To Guides

How to Create Your Personal Zacke Account
How to Register to Bid on Zacke Live
How to Leave Absentee Bids Online
How to Leave Telephone Bids Online

 

中文版本的操作指南 

创建新账号
注册Zacke Live在线直播竞拍(免平台费)
缺席投标和电话投标

 

Third-Party Bidding

We partner with best-in-class third-party partners to make it easy for you to bid online in the channel of your choice. Please note that if you bid with one of our third-party online partners, then there will be a live bidding surcharge on top of your final purchase price. You can find all of our fees here. Here's a full list of our third-party partners:

  • 51 Bid Live
  • EpaiLive
  • ArtFoxLive
  • Invaluable
  • LiveAuctioneers
  • the-saleroom
  • lot-tissimo
  • Drouot

Please note that we place different auctions on different platforms. For example, in general, we only place Chinese art auctions on 51 Bid Live.

  

Bidding in Person

You must register to bid in person and will be assigned a paddle at the auction. Please contact us at office@zacke.at or +43 (1) 532 04 52 for the latest local health and safety guidelines.